351st Bomb Group

Polebrook, England

Group Mission #121

Credited Mission #115

 
DATE: 7 May 1944
Target: Plan "A" - Berlin, Germany.
 
Briefing Outline:
  1. Airplane and Crew Assignment Check.

  2. Time Schedule:
     Lead Box Low Box
    Stations   –0535Stations   –0545
    Start Engines –0545Start Engines –0555
    Taxi     –0555Taxi     –0605
    Take Off   –0610Take Off   –After Lead Group
    Last Take Off –Last Take Off –

  3. Targets: Plan A   Plan B
    Primary: Berlin   Rotenburg
    Secondary: Berlin   Bremerhaven [Germany]
    Last Resort: Any Mil. [Military] target in Germany not disrupt. [disruptive to] Fighters or any A/D [Airdrome] in Holland not near built-up areas.
  4. Loading:
    351 "A"  3x1000# + 5 M-17’s (Skymarker in Lead & Deputy)
    351st "B"  3x1000# + 5 M-17’s (Skymarker in Lead & Deputy)
    Composite
    Nickels [Propaganda Leaflets] in Ship # - 153-F   492-B
    Chaff: All ships 384 units
  5. Gasoline Loading: Full 2780 [Gallons]
    Remarks: ____

  6. Wing Formation94th (A) CBW94th (B) CBWComp. GroupComp. CBW
    Lead351st401st
    Low351st401st
    High457th92nd

  7. Division Formation:
    PositionCBW [Combat Wing]TargetDeparture Time at Coast
    Lead94th "A"BerlinZero [Hour]
    2nd94th "B"Berlin+1½’
    3rd1stBerlin+3'
    4th40thBerlin+4½’
    5th41st "A"Berlin+6'
    6th41st "B"Berlin+7½’
    7th
    8th
    Plan BPlan A
    2nd Division5 CBW’sMunster-OsnabrückRotenburg B-24's Liege
    3rd Division7 CBW'sBerlinFrance
    Marauders
    RAF [Royal Air Force]

    Remarks: ____

  8. Fighter Cover:
    • ___________________________
      ___________________________

  9. Group Assembly:
    BoxAltitudePlace
    351st10,000' Deenethorpe B [Buncher] 
    351st8,500'Deenethorpe B [Buncher]
    457th11,500'Deenethorpe B [Buncher]

  10. Navigator - _____
  11. S-2 - _____
  12. Weather - _____
  13. Special Instructions to Navigators, Bombardiers and Radio Operators:
    250’ interval on bombs.
    Release chaff 3 mins. before IP [Initial Point of Bomb Run] at 4 per 10 secs. For 16 minutes.
  14. Squadron Leaders and Group Deputy report to Target Room. All but Pilots Dismissed.
  15. (A) Code Words –
    PFF Bombing –Big Pole
    Visual Bombing -Roy Tan
    Authenticator –Fat Boy
    RecallAbandon -Light Horse Harry
    Weather Code -VABIT
    Release "CHAFF" -Tin Hat

    (B) Call Signs:
    Call SignFlaresRemarks
    351st AWoodcraft RedRY [Red Yellow]
    351st BWoodcraft BrownR [Red]
    401st AWoodcraft BlueG [Green]
    401st B
    457th A
    457th B
    Composite
    1st C.B.W.
    40th C.B.W.
    41st C.B.W.
    94th B Composite CBWSmokestackRY

    (C)
    U.S. Fighters
    R.A.F. Fighters
     BombersVinegrove 1-1
    U.S. Grnd. ControlColgate
    R.A.F. Grnd. Control

    Control Points:Fighter Reference Points:
     _____ ______
     ___________
    Remarks:

    (D)
    Colors of the Day
    TimeColorLetterChallenge
    0200 - 0800GGMO
    0800 – 1400RYDY
    1400 – 2000RRGH

    (E) Ships To Monitor [Radio Channels A, B, C & D]
    1. - All except below:
    2. - 711-F, 613-C, 202-Z, 725-L
    3. - 721-S, 384-T, 191-X, 857-J, 9th - Lead & Deputy on D button - 8th "C" 325-H, 702-A, 349-B, 146-D
    4. - Air/Sea Rescue

  16. Let-Down on Deenethorpe Buncher, if overcast.
    351st A   Lead 15° Mag. [Magnetic Compass Heading]
    351st B   Low 360° Mag. [Magnetic Compass Heading]
    401st A     ° Mag.
    457th A     ° Mag.
    94th B   Splasher 7

  17. Flying Control. –
    1. Taxi Plan.
    2. Emergency Fields.
    3. Landing Aids.

  18. Special Instructions:
    Fly route after target & avoid flak.
    Maintain CBW [Combat Wing] interval for adv. of Fighter support.
    Base Ref. Altitude = 20,000’.
    Bomb as CBW visual or PFF.
    Weather ship is Hotmint “V” Victor.
    Emerg. Field is Woodbridge - 52°05’N-01°24’E.
    Low Group fly & bomb on right.
    94th A & B use same flares – They assemble on Spl. #4 & meet you at Sutton Bridge.
    Spares turn back at Mid-Channel.
    Maintain radio silence.
    Descend after target at 165 MPH – 300 ft./min.
    Return cruise is 150 MPH.


Operational Narrative – Lead Combat Box:
  1. General Narrative. Eighteen aircraft plus two PFF ships took off as briefed. Both the combat wing and division rendezvous were effected without incident. Slight wind changes were encountered when leaving the English coast so that formations were late at Control Points 1, 2, and 3. By cutting the corner, time at Point 5 was made good.
     About fifteen or twenty minutes before the IP [Initial Point of Bomb Run] was reached, the H2X [Ground Radar] in the lead ship went out and the deputy took the lead from this point back to base. Due to reasons unknown to the pilot, the mickey operator overshot his IP slightly and made a large gradual turn around Berlin proper, making the bomb run approximately East to West. While this was being done, some of the following wings cut across as briefed so that the 94th Combat Wing bombed either fourth or fifth. It is believed that the bomb run was good, as a brief check was made through a slight break in the clouds over the city. Bombing was from combat wing formation.
     The return from the target was more direct than briefed, thus permitting the formation to get back on the time schedule.
     Flak was encountered at Vechta [Germany], where it was light and fairly accurate. Flak at the target was heavy in spots and not too accurate. Formations were attacking from several directions and at very nearly the same time and at only slightly varying altitudes, which facts are believed to have contributed to the inaccuracy of the flak defenses. Chaff is thought to have been effective also, inasmuch as bursts of flak were observed at heights above the clouds and far below the formations.
     No enemy fighters were seen and friendly support was satisfactory, though at times no escort was visible. It is believed they were present but some distance away.
     VHF channels were jammed and badly cluttered up with unnecessary conversation.
     The formation at bombing was fair.
     The combat wings fell in column on the return and returned by the same general route without incident.
  2. Aircraft Not Attacking. Eighteen aircraft plus two PFF ships took off from base and formed as indicated on the Formation At Take-Off diagram. Aircraft 42-97169, pilot Lt. Garcia, was scheduled as a flying spare and returned as planned. This aircraft was not dispatched. Aircraft 42-31711, pilot Lt. Evans, returned from 52°47’N-09°22’E [Rethem/Aller, Germany] when the #3 and #4 engines became rough at 22,000 feet. Bombs were jettisoned while the aircraft was over Germany. Aircraft 42-37845, pilot Lt. Whalen, returned from 52°35’N-06°40’E [just South of Loozen, Netherlands] with the report that the #4 engine was smoking. Aircraft 42-31899, pilot Lt. McClelland, returned from 52°40’N-06°32’E [Nieuw Moscou, Netherlands], reporting that the electrical system was out. These three aircraft were dispatched. The remaining fourteen aircraft, plus the two PFF ships, continued as indicated in the General Narrative and attacked the target in the formation indicated on the Formation Over Target diagram.
  3. Aircraft Lost. Aircraft 42-37714, pilot Lt. Presley, was hit by flak in the target area just before bombs away. It disappeared in the clouds before any chutes were seen, apparently under control.
  4. Combat Wing Commander. Colonel Eugene A. Romig, flying in the PFF aircraft leading the combat wing formation, was the Combat Wing Air Commander.

STATISTICAL SUMMARY
No. of A/C Scheduled - Less one Flying Spares17
No. of A/C Taking Off - Less one Flying Spares17
No. of A/C Dispatched17
No. of A/C Attacking14
No. of A/C Not Attacking - Less one Flying Spares3
No. of A/C Lost - To Flak1
NOTE: The above summary does not include the two PFF aircraft. The one aircraft indicated as lost is considered as having attacked the target.
[Signed] Clinton F. Ball, Lt. Colonel, Air Corps, Operations Officer


Operational Narrative – Low Combat Box:
  1. General Narrative. The low group took off on schedule behind the lead box without an interruption of the thirty second interval.
     On arriving at Deenethorpe, the lead and high boxes were found to be circling and partially formed. The low box fell into trail and followed until the wing left the buncher two minutes early. On the first turn, the low box cut the corner slightly and slid into formation.
     Climbs and turns to the enemy coast was as briefed and no difficulty was experienced. A few bursts of ineffective flak were seen at the enemy coast.
     From then until the coast was re-crossed, the PFF ship would turn left a few degrees and then right a few degrees, as if it were trying to pick a landmark. About half way into the target, light accurate flak was encountered. The lead ship received several holes at this point and the lead navigator was wounded, though not seriously.
     The deputy PFF aircraft took over the lead at the IP [Initial Point of Bomb Run], and the combat wing maneuvered onto the bomb run as indicated in the General Narrative for the Lead Box. Flak over the target was heavy and inaccurate.
     The letdown was started was started simultaneously with a right turn, and the low box slightly over-ran the formation. Position was regained approximately two minutes later.
     The return trip was uneventful. Following the lead box during a 360° letdown over the English coast, the low box fell into trail and followed the lead box back to base for a normal landing.
     Some difficulty was experienced by 2nd element leaders taking over the squadron lead.
     No enemy aircraft were sighted. Fighter cover was poor going into the target, but was good at the IP and on the route out.

  2. Aircraft Not Attacking. Twenty aircraft, including two flying spares, took off and formed as indicated on the diagram of Formation At Take-Off. Aircraft 42-97157 and 42-31714, pilots Lt. Nall and Lt. Smith, were scheduled as flying spares and returned as planned. Aircraft 42-31725, pilot Lt. Berardi, returned from mid-channel with the report that gasoline siphoned out of the No, 2 tank. Aircraft 42-97196, pilot Lt. Raser, returned from 52°23’N-00°52’E [between Rushford & Knettishall, England], and reported that the #4 engine failed. None of these aircraft was classed as dispatched.
     Aircraft 42-31748, pilot Lt. Turbyne, returned from 52°37’N-04°55’E [between Ursem and Avenhorn, Netherlands] with the report that the #4 engine was running rough and the navigator’s oxygen was low. This aircraft was dispatched.
     The remaining fifteen aircraft continued as indicated in the General Narrative and attacked the target in the formation indicated on the Formation Over Target diagram.
  3. Aircraft Lost. No aircraft were lost from the Low Combat Box on the Mission of 7 May, 1944.
  4. Group Leader.  Captain Robert B. Clay, flying in aircraft 42-38005, led the Low Combat Box of the 94th “A” Combat Wing.

STATISTICAL SUMMARY
No. of A/C Scheduled - Less two flying spares18
No. of A/C Taking Off- Less two flying spares18
No. of A/C Dispatched16
No. of A/C Attacking15
No. of A/C Not Attacking - Less two flying spares3
No. of A/C Lost0


[Signed] Clinton F. Ball, Lt. Colonel, Air Corps, Operations Officer






Bombardier’s Narrative – Lead Box:

Group: 351st Low Group
Target: Berlin, Germany
Method of Bombing: P.F.F.
Altitude: 26,000’
Direction of Attack: 279° Magnetic Heading
Wind Direction: 22°
Wind Velocity: 70 MPH
Bombardier’s Narrative: Flew the Lead Box in the 94th A Combat Wing leading 1st Division. Bombing was on PFF on a magnetic heading of 279°. Bombs away took place at 1116 hours.

[Signed:] Thomas E. Trolinger, 1st Lt., Air Corps, Lead Bombardier



Bombardier’s Narrative – Low Box:

Group: 351st (Low)
Target: Berlin, Germany
Method of Bombing: PFF
Altitude: 25,000’
Direction of Attack: 274° Magnetic Heading
Wind Direction: 20°
Wind Velocity: 50 Knots
Bombardier’s Narrative: Flew the Low Box in the 94th Combat Wing leading the 1st Division. Bombing was on PFF on a magnetic heading of 274° and bombs were away at 1116 hours.

[Signed:] George W. Arnold, 1st Lt., Air Corps, Lead Bombardier



Combat Bombing Flight Record – Lead Box:

Bombardier - 1st Lt. Trolinger, Thomas E.  Pilot - Col. Romig, Eugene A. Navigator - 1st Lt. Badger, William D., Jr.
Aircraft   7651-C  Take-off - 0610 Landed - 1430
Objective - Berlin, Germany
Aiming Point (MPI) [Mean Point of Impact] - P.F.F.
Initial Point - P.F.F.
Method of Attack - Wing
No. of Attacking A/C in Group: - 13   Composite Group -
Number A/C Dropping Bombs by own Sighting Operation: PFF
Deflection and Range Sighting, Group: P.F.F.   Composite Group -
Range Sighting only, Group - P.F.F.    Composite Group -
Bombs, Types and Sizes - 3 AN M44 1,000 LB G.P.[General Purpose]
Number of Bombs Loaded - 8   Released - 8
Fusing, Nose - 1/10   Tail - 1/40
Synchronization - P.F.F. On
Information at Release Point:

Altitude of Target - 115'Magnetic Heading Ordered 216° Actual 279°
True Altitude Above Target - 25,350'True Heading ___°
Indicated Altitude - 26,000'Drift, Estimated 4½° Left - Actual __°
Pressure Altitude of Target -68True Track ___°
Altimeter Setting 29.92Actual Range 17,596'
Calculated Indicated Air Speed - 150 M.P.H.B.S. Type - M-9 Mercury
True Air Speed - 226 M.P.H.Time of Release 1116
Ground Speed Est. 306 Actual 236Length of Bombing Run - 15 min.
Wind Direction Metro - 20° Actual - 22°Intervalometer Setting - Train
Wind Velocity Metro 81 Actual 70 C-1 Pilot [Autopilot] _____
D.S. - 127.5  Trail - 45   ATF - 41.60A-5 Pilot _____
Tan. D.A, Est. .70 Actual P.F.F. Manual Pilot - X [Used]

Type of Release - Train
Point of Impact If Seen - No
Mean Temp. Metro -18.5 Actual -15
Winds - Altitude - 26,000 Ft.  Direction - Metro 20°  Actual 22°  Velocity - Metro 81  Actual 70
Temp C. - Metro -40° C. Actual -40° C.



Combat Bombing Flight Record – Low Box:

Bombardier - 1st Lt. Arnold, George W.   Pilot - Capt. Clay, Robert E.  Navigator - 1st Lt. Pullen, Marshall R.
Aircraft # 38005-G  Take-off - 0623½  Landed - 1447
Objective - Berlin, Germany
Aiming Point (MPI) [Mean Point of Impact] - PFF
Initial Point - PFF
Method of Attack - Wing
Number of Attacking A/C in Group - 15    Composite Group -
Number A/C Dropping Bombs by own sighting operation - PFF
Deflection and Range sighting, Group - PFF   Composite Group -
Range Sighting only, Group - PFF    Composite Group -
Bombs, Types and Sizes - 3 AN M44 1,000 LB G.P. [General Purpose] & 5 M17 500 LB I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
Number of Bombs Loaded - 8    Released - 8
Fusing, Nose - 1/10    Tail - 1/40
Synchronization - PFF On
Information at Release Point:

Altitude of Target - 115Magnetic Heading Ordered 216° Actual 274°
True Altitude Above Target - 24,280True Heading 270°
Indicated Altitude - 25,000Drift, Estimated 4½° Left - Actual 10° Left
Pressure Altitude of Target -68True Track 284°
Altimeter Setting 29.92Actual Range 17,193’
Calculated Indicated Air Speed - 150 M.P.H.B.S. Type - M-9
True Air Speed - 222Time of Release - 1116
Ground Speed Est. 306 Actual 256Length of Bombing Run - 15 min.
Wind Direction Metro - 20° Actual - 20°Intervalometer Setting - Salvo
Wind Velocity Metro 70 Knots Actual 50 Knots C-1 Pilot [Autopilot] _____
D.S. - 130.6  Trail - .43   ATF - 40.59A-5 Pilot _____
Tan. D.A, Est. .71 Actual PFF Manual Pilot Yes

Type of Release - Train
Point of Impact If Seen - No
Mean Temp. Metro -18.5 Actual -18
Winds - Altitude - 24,000 Ft.  Direction - Metro 20° Actual 20° Velocity - Metro 70K Actual 50K
Temp C. - Metro -40° C. Actual -40° C.



Intelligence S-2 Reports:
  1. Sixteen (16) bombs of G-37 nickels [Propaganda Leaflets] were dropped in the target area.
  2. Due to heavy cloud coverage no photographic evidence of bombing results is available. Crews were also unable to observe the bombing results.
  3. No enemy aircraft seen throughout the mission.
  4. Two crews reported a few inaccurate bursts which they believe were fired from a ship off the Dutch Coast near IJuimuiden; there was also moderate fairly accurate flak from the mainland in this area. Moderate accurate flak was encountered in the Dümmer Lake area. There was meager inaccurate flak at Nienburg, Hesepe, and Perleberg. Flak at the target was intense, and some of it was aimed accurately at our formation. Meager inaccurate flak was encountered at Ijmuiden on the way out.
  5. 9/10 to 10/10’s cloud over the continent prevented visual bombing.
  6. Due to heavy cloud coverage no observations were made during the mission.
  7. PFF units were employed. Fighter support appeared as briefed and provided excellent cover. Our A/C 714-T was hit by flak over the target just before bombs away and was last seen heading down under control. This A/C disappeared in the clouds before any chutes could be seen. At 1030 hours a B-17 was seen going down north of Osnabrück; seven parachutes were seen. One of our A/C landed at Woodbridge, reason unknown.


Bomb Camera Photos:
Click on Photo to Enlarge



Track Chart:
Click on Chart to Enlarge



A.A. Gunfire (Flak) Report:

1. Target: Assigned - Berlin  Bombed - Berlin
2. Route as Flown. - 2 miles N. of IJmuiden – Vechta – Strelitz – Peetzig – Beeskow – Neu Zittau – Target – Luckenwalde – back on briefed route.
3. Weather Conditions - A. at Target. - 9/10 cloud   B. Enroute - 9 – 10/10 cloud
4. Were our A/C "Seen" or "Unseen" targets? (a) At Target - Probably unseen at target  (b) Enroute - Probably unseen on route
 Any Condensation Trails? - Light – non-persistent
5. Description of Flak, including type of Fire Control: Intense; some of it was accurate for our formation, some was not. There was definite evidence of continuous following fire control. Bursts were scattered over a fairly large area, possibly because some of them were aimed at other formations in the vicinity at the same time.
6. Flak encountered or observed en route. (In the order experienced) -
 IJmuiden, 0841, 22,000’ – a few inaccurate bursts believed fired from a ship.
 Ijmuiden, 0843, 22,000’ – moderate, fairly accurate.
 Dümmer Lake Area, 0935, 21,000’ – moderate, accurate.
 Nienburg, 0946, 22,000’ – meager, inaccurate.
 Hesepe, 1020, 24,000’ – meager, inaccurate.
 Perleberg, 1033, 25,000’ – meager, inaccurate.
 IJmuiden, 1315, 21,500’ – meager, inaccurate.
7. Was Chaff carried? - Yes  How discharged? In target area
8. Position of Group - Lead and Low
9. Group – Lead A/C over enemy terr. – 17 A/C damaged – Unavailable A/C lost to flak – 1 Time over Target – 1116 
Time of bombs away – 1116 Height – 25,500’ Axis of attack – 270°M Bomb run – 8 Min.
Group – Low A/C over enemy terr. – 15 A/C damaged – Unavailable A/C lost to flak – 0 Time over Target – 1116 
Time of bombs away – 1116 Height – 25,200’ Axis of attack – 360°M  Bomb run – 15 Min.
10. Comments - Phenomena: None



Combat Crew Comments:

    508th Squadron:
A/C 146-D: No rations in airplane. – Whole crew.
A/C 702-A: Take evasive action after bombs away. – Lt. Crowe.
 Have Ordnance pull pin on IB. – Lt. Branaman.
 Check chin sights for alignment with guns. – Lt. Wohleder.
A/C 349-B: Ship that aborted gave our altitude – just after that there was accurate flak. – Lt. Carson.
A/C 613-C: Did not fly mission as briefed; were flying 140 [Knots] at times. – Lt. Weeks.
 Think we should have two waist gunners – one cannot watch both sides. – Sgt. Parsons.

    509th Squadron:
A/C 202-Z: Could get flak suits for only 8 men, and need them for everyone. – Whole crew.
A/C 193-P: Would like a much better box for the Air Medal. – EM. [Enlisted Men]
A/C 120-O: This plane is not fit to fly in combat. Turbo trouble made us fly on 2½ engines from the enemy coast all the way in and out again, and it was almost impossible to keep in formation. – Lt. Hicks.

    510th Squadron:
A/C 975-O: EM [Enlisted Men] had French toast for breakfast. Five men sick from dirty plates. – Sgt. Suddock.
A/C 721-S: Try to develop something for the electric suits so that when a crew member perspires the circuit will not short through. This person has had three suits go bad on him. – Lt. Shattuck.
A/C 560-A: EM request less French toast for breakfast. Would like an egg now and then.

    511th Squadron:
A/C 987-D: Spare bag only contained a mask and a chute. Needed heated blanket for care of co-pilot, but didn’t have one. – Lt. Evans.

[Signed] Robert P. Ramsey, Captain, Air Corps, Group S-2 [Intelligence]



Mission Summary Report – Lead Box:
  1. Abortives:
    1. Airplane No. 42-31711, 508th Squadron, returned early because #3 and #4 engines were running rough, according to the Pilot’s statement. Investigation and altitude test flight disclosed no defects.
    2. Airplane No. 42-97169, 509th Squadron, returned early as planned.
    3. Airplane No. 42-37845, 509th Squadron, returned early because of internal failure #4 engine.
    4. Airplane No. 42-31899, 510th Squadron, returned early because of electrical system failure, according to the Pilot’s statement. Investigation disclosed low batteries.
  2. Battle Damage:
    1. Airplane No. 42-97325, 508th Squadron. Flak hole top of left elevator. Flak hole through vertical stabilizer. Flak hole top of right wing inboard panel damaging supercharger lines.
    2. Airplane No. 42-31702, 508th Squadron. Flak hole leading edge right wing between fuselage and #3 nacelle.
    3. Airplane No. 42-102613, 508th Squadron. Flak hole underside of left wing tip, skin damage. Flak hole underside of right wing, inboard panel, skin and corrugation damage.
    4. Airplane No. 42-97149, 509th Squadron. One flak hole through vertical stabilizer. One flak hole top of left Horizontal stabilizer. Three flak holes leading edge of right wing.
    5. Airplane No. 42-97144, 509th squadron. One flak hole top of right wing near fuselage.
    6. Airplane No. 42-31384, 509th Squadron. One flak hole #2 ring cowl. One flak hole plexiglass nose.
    7. Airplane No. 42-3120, 509th Squadron. One flak hole top of fuselage near right wing connection. One flak hole underside left wing tip.
    8. Airplane No. 42-102576, 510th Squadron. Numerous small flak holes top of left wing inboard panel. Flak hole #3 propeller. Flak hole leading edge of right wing, damaging de-icer lines. One flak hole through leading edge and top of right horizontal stabilizer. Numerous small flak holes top of Right wing inboard panel, damage to skin and corrugation. Two flak holes underside LH wing panel damaging flap and landing light wires. One flak hole left side of fuselage rear of wing, damaging electric wiring. Two flak holes right side of vertical stabilizer. Flak hole in fuselage below co-Pilot’s window, damaging stiffeners.
    9. Airplane No. 42-38038, 510th Squadron. Flak hole top of left elevator. Flak hole leading edge of RH stabilizer damaging stringer and bulkhead.
    10. Airplane No. 42-31975, 510th Squadron. Flak hole through left aileron. Two flak holes top turret. One flak hole leading edge left wing, damaging #2 oil cooler fairing. Flak hole left side of fuselage, forward of waist window.
    11. Airplane No. 42-31721, 510th Squadron. Flak hole top of fuselage right of top turret, damaging longerons and circumferential stiffeners. Two flak holes right wing. One flak hole left wing, underside, skin damage only.

    TOTAL A/C DAMAGEDMINOR DAMAGEDAMAGED BY FLAK
    111111
[Signed:] Otto R. Vasak, Captain, Air Corps, Station S-4 [Engineering] Officer


Mission Summary Report – Low Box:
  1. Abortives:
    1. Airplane No. 42-97157, 508th Squadron, returned early as planned.
    2. Airplane No. 42-31725, 509th Squadron, returned early. Pilot reported gas siphoning from #2 fuel tank. Investigation revealed no deficiencies. Probable cause of siphoning was that E-5 valve was turned on too soon after take-off.
    3. Airplane No. 42-97196, 510th Squadron, returned early because of internal failure of #4 engine.
    4. Airplane No. 42-31714, 511th Squadron, returned early as planned.
    5. Airplane No. 42-31748, 511th Squadron, returned early because #4 engine ran rough and navigator was using an excessive amount of oxygen. Investigation revealed #9 cylinder on #4 engine was pumping oil excessively. This cylinder is being changed. Oxygen system was checked and serviced to 400 lbs., and no leaks were found. Several emergency valves on oxygen regulators had safety wire broken. Extra regulator in right side of radio room had safety wire broken and valve slightly open and was leaking slowly.
  2. Battle Damage:
    1. Airplane No. 42-38146, 508th Squadron. Two flak holes through trailing edge of right wing inner panel; skin and corrugation damaged. Flak hole on left side of fuselage forward of waist window. Flak entered near base of vertical stabilizer and came out underside causing damage to skin, jack-box and wiring. Flak hole in leading edge of left horizontal stabilizer causing damage to skin channels and fabric of elevator.
    2. Airplane No. 42-97349, 508th Squadron. Flak hole on underside of navigator’s compartment causing damage to skin and bomb-rack wiring. Small flak hole in left bomb-bay door, causing damage to skin. Small flak hole near #1 engine nacelle causing damage to skin. Two small flak holes underside of right horizontal stabilizer near elevator hinge.
    3. Airplane No. 42-97202, 509th Squadron. Small flak hole through trailing edge of right wing behind #3 engine; skin and corrugation damage.
    4. Airplane No. 42-97193, 509th Squadron. Small flak hole on underside of left wing near fairing causing damage to glycol system. Small flak hole on leading edge of left outer wing panel causing skin damage.
    5. Airplane No. 42-38005, 509th Squadron. Three flak holes in left side of vertical stabilizer near base causing damage to skin. Flak hole through right window of navigator’s compartment.
    6. Airplane No. 42-31509, 510th Squadron. Right aileron torn by flak. Three small flak holes in leading edge of left horizontal stabilizer causing damage to skin. Flak hole on right side of vertical stabilizer near leading edge causing damage to channel and bulkhead. Small flak hole in right side of fuselage below top turret causing skin damage.
    7. Airplane No. 42-30857, 510th Squadron. Flak hole through right wing inboard panel damaging chord and stiffener. One flak hole top of right wing, skin damage only. Flak hole through vertical stabilizer, damaging stringer. Flak hole through right side of fuselage rear of nose section damaging A.F.C.E. [Automatic Flight Control Equipment (Auto Pilot)] mount and circumferential stiffener.
    8. Airplane No. 42-97492, 511th Squadron. Flak hole through right side of vertical stabilizer. Flak hole through right side of plexiglass nose section. Flak hole in pilot’s compartment, skin damage only. Flak hole bottom right elevator.
    9. Airplane No. 42-38153, 511th Squadron. Two flak holes leading edge of left horizontal stabilizer near fuselage. Flak hole bottom of #2 nacelle damaging exhaust stack. Flak hole top of RH wing panel just rear of leading edge. Flak hole top of right wing inboard panel, skin damage.
    10. Airplane No. 42-97472, 511th Squadron. Flak hole top of left elevator. Flak hole leading edge right wing. Flak hole #3 nacelle.
    11. Airplane No. 42-39987, 511th Squadron. Two flak holes leading edge of right wing. Three flak holes top of left wing, skin damage. Flak hole Pilot’s compartment, extensive damage. Flak hole left side of fuselage forward of tail gunner’s compartment. Flak hole in bombardier’s window. Flak hole left side of fuselage above wing. Two flak holes right side of fuselage below navigator’s compartment.
    12. Airplane No. 42-97318, 511th Squadron. Flak hole top of left aileron. Flak hole left side of fuselage below bombardier’s window.
    13. Airplane No. 42-31238, 511th Squadron. Flak hole leading edge of right wing. Flak hole top of right wing tip. Flak hole top of left wing inboard panel forward of trailing edge.

    TOTAL A/C DAMAGEDMINOR DAMAGEBY FLAK
    131313
[Signed:] Otto R. Vasak, Captain, Air Corps, Station S-4 [Engineering] Officer


Armament Report – Lead Combat Box:
  1. The following armament malfunctions and failures were reported by the Lead Combat Box on the Mission of 7 May, 1944.
    1. A/C 42-38038 – The intervalometer ran off and the pilot’s indicator light flashed, but the bombs did not drop. Bombs were salvoed with five seconds delay. The ship checks out satisfactorily on the ground, and will be given a high altitude test.
    2. A/C 42-102576 – (All electrical) The bombardier failed to turn on the bomb bay selector switches, with the result that bombs could not be dropped in train or salvo. Bombs were later jettisoned by use of the salvo switch.
  2. A total of two (2) all electrical ships participated in this Mission in the Lead Combat Box.
  3. The Station Ordnance Officer has reported the expenditure of 2,870 rounds of caliber .50 ammunition on the Mission of this date by the Lead Combat Box. This figure does not include 9,000 rounds carried by A/C 42-37714 which is reported missing in action.
[Signed:] Michael Steele, CWO, USA, Group Armament Officer


Armament Report – Low Combat Box:
  1. The following armament malfunctions and failures were reported by the Low Combat Box on the Mission of 7 May, 1944.
    1. A/C 42-97349 – (All electrical) Half of the bombs dropped in train. Flak then cut the wires making it necessary to salvo the remaining half of the load. The wires are being repaired.
    2. A/C 42-97492 – (Carrying 8 “Nickel” bombs) Four bombs released in train, but the remainder had to be salvoed. The ship checks out perfectly on the ground.
    3. A/C 42-38146 – Bomb bay doors froze. The pilot released the bombs by use of the emergency release. The aircraft ground checks satisfactorily.
    4. A/C 42-97202 – (All electrical) The 1,000# bombs dropped in train, and the salvo switch released four of the incendiary bombs. The last bomb was released manually by the radio operator in the bomb bay. No attempt had been made to use the pilot salvo or the crew salvo. The ship checks out satisfactorily on the ground and will be given a high altitude test.
    5. A/C 42-31238 – All but two of the 500# bombs released and the doors were then closed without the bombardier knowing the two bombs were still there. Bombs were later jettisoned by salvo. The ship checks out on the ground and will be checked at altitude.
  2. A total of six (6) all electrical ships participated in this Mission in the Low Combat Box.
  3. The Station Ordnance Officer has reported the expenditure of 2,450 rounds of caliber .50 ammunition by the Low Combat Box on the Mission of this date.
[Signed:] Michael Steele, CWO, AUS, Group Armament Officer


Disposition of Bombs – Lead Combat Box:

1. Following is the disposition of bombs loaded for the Mission of 7 May, 1944.

AIRCRAFTBOMBS
Main BombfallOver TargetBombingNumberSizeTypeFusing: NoseTail
(Berlin)1313391000 lb.GP1/101/40
65500 lb. Incendiary  Instantanous 
Total Bombs Dropped391000 lb.GP1/101/40
65500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
Jettisoned in Germany By Abortive A/C31000 lb.GP1/101/40
5500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
In Aircraft M.I.A.31000 lb.GP1/101/40
5500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
Bombs Brought Back91000 lb.GP1/101/40
15500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
TOTAL BOMBS LOADED541000 lb.GP1/101/40
90500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
Note: Does not include 2 PFF A/C.
[Signed:] Robert B. Stratton, Captain, Air Corps, Statistical Officer



Disposition of Bombs – Low Combat Box:

1. Following is the disposition of bombs loaded for the Mission of 7 May, 1944.

AIRCRAFTBOMBS
Main BombfallOver TargetBombingNumberSizeTypeFusing: NoseTail
(Berlin)1513391000 lb.GP1/101/40
65500 lb. Incendiary  Instantanous 
Total Bombs Dropped391000 lb.GP1/101/40
65500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
Jettisoned in Channel31000 lb.GP1/101/40
5500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
Bombs Brought Back121000 lb.GP1/101/40
20500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
TOTAL BOMBS LOADED541000 lb.GP1/101/40
90500 lb.IncendiaryInstantaneous
Note: Two A/C carried full loads of Nickels [Propaganda Leaflets].
[Signed:] Robert B. Stratton, Captain, Air Corps, Statistical Officer



Deficiencies and Disabilities:

1. The following deficiencies and disabilities were determined following interrogation.

   511th Bombardment Squadron (H)
A/C 318 Short in right sleeve. – Lt. Brooks.

   509th Bombardment Squadron (H)
A/C 120 Oxygen Mask froze. – Sgt. Donelan.

[Signed:] Ernest J. Cater, 1st Lt., Air Corps, Group Equipment Officer


Aircraft Returning Early:

Aircraft No. 711-F  Squadron - 508th   Pilot - Evans
Time of Abortive - 0956   Location when Aborted - 52°47’N-09°22’E [near Rethem/Aller, Germany]
Reason - Engines rough, #3 & #4 at 22,000’. On return, #1 rough.
Disposition of Bombs: Jettisoned unobserved in Germany.
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 20,000’
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks:
[Signed] H. Evans
[Handwritten on side – Sortie]



Aircraft No. 97169  Squadron - 509th   Pilot - Time of Abortive - 0830   Location when Aborted - Spare
Reason -
Disposition of Bombs: Returned
Altitude At Time of Aborting: ____
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks:
[Signed] Garcia



Aircraft No. 31748  Squadron - 511th   Pilot - Turbyne
Time of Abortive - 0850   Location when Aborted - 52°37’N-04°56’E [just west of Avenhorn, Netherlands]
Reason - #4 eng. Was running very rough. Navigator’s oxygen was down to 200 lb. We started with 400 lbs.
Disposition of Bombs: Landed with them.
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 22,500’
Enemy Opposition Encountered - Heavy flak over the enemy coast.
Remarks:
[Signed] F.W. Turbyne



Aircraft No. 37845  Squadron - 509th   Pilot - Whalen
Time of Abortive - 0859   Location when Aborted - 52°35’N-6°40’E [south of Loozen, Netherlands]
Reason - No. 4 engine smoking. It started about 08:30 with a steady increase. Instruments normal, no roughness of engine – Looked like exhaust manifold burning.
Disposition of Bombs: Brought bombs back.
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 22,500’
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks:
[Signed] Robert G. Whalen
[Handwritten on side – Sortie.]



Aircraft No. 31899  Squadron - 510th   Pilot - McClelland
Time of Abortive - 0915   Location when Aborted - 52°40’N-06°32’E [just south of Nieuw Moscou, Netherlands]
Reason - Electrical system failure.
Disposition of Bombs: Brought back
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 26,700’
Enemy Opposition Encountered - Flak in wing and one piece came through bomb bay putting dent in incendiary bomb.
Remarks:
[Signed] Clyde W. McClelland
[Handwritten on side – Sortie.]


Aircraft No. 31714  Squadron - 510th   Pilot - Smith
Time of Abortive - ____  Location when Aborted - ____
Reason - Spare
Disposition of Bombs: ____
Altitude At Time of Aborting: ____
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks: ____
[Signed] ____



Aircraft No. 31725  Squadron - 509th   Pilot - Berardi
Time of Abortive - 0825   Location when Aborted - Half way across channel
Reason - Gas siphoned out of No. 2 tank.
[Handwritten in – Chkd on]
Disposition of Bombs: Brought home
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 19,000’
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks:
[Signed] J.R. Berardi, 1st Lt., AC [Air Corps]



Aircraft No. 97157  Squadron - 508th   Pilot - Nall
Time of Abortive - 0816   Location when Aborted - 52°29’N-02°21’E [Above Channel 25 miles E. of Lowestoft, England]
Reason - Very bad detonation in No. 3 engine. Ship (N 157)
Disposition of Bombs: Returned them
Altitude At Time of Aborting: ____
Enemy Opposition Encountered - ____
Remarks: ____
[Signed] John L. Nall



Aircraft No. 97196  Squadron - 510th   Pilot - Raser
Time of Abortive - 0748   Location when Aborted - 52°23’N-00°52’E [55 miles ESE of Polebrook, England]
Reason - #4 engine failure; oil leaking from engine breather, oil press. fluctuation.
Disposition of Bombs: Dropped.
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 11,000’
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks:
[Signed] William R. Raser



“J” Form:
  1. Call Letter and Last Four numbers of A/C in each Squadron:
    a. 94th Combat Wing   Lead "A" Group
    Sqdn 508th A/C: 1711–F, 2613–C, 1702–A, 7325–H
    Sqdn 509th A/C: 7845–F, 1384–T, 3120–O, 0499–Q, 7144–R, 7149–X, (7164–N Spare)
    Sqdn 510th A/C: 1899–B, 7077–D, 1721–S, 2576–C, 8038–R, 1925–O, (7714–T Spare)
    Sqdn 511th A/C: None
    P.F.F. Sqdn 324 A/C: 7651–C, 7601–J

    b. 94th Combat Wing   Low "A" Group
    Sqdn 508th A/C: 8146–D, 7349–B, (7157–N Spare)
    Sqdn 509th A/C: 8005–G, 7193–P, 7202–Z, 1725–L
    Sqdn 510th A/C: 1509–V, 0857–J, 1560–A, 7196–M
    Sqdn 511th A/C: 7472–H, 1748–V, 9987–D, 1238–A, 7191–X, 7318–S, 7492–B, 8153–F, (1714–R Spare),
  2. Target: GH487A
  3. W/T and R/T Operational Call Sign of each Squadron:
    Squadron508 [Call Sign]W/T KZX R/T CARLTONSquadron510 [Call Sign]W/T TUZ R/T TIPSTAFF
    Squadron509 [Call Sign]W/T MPH R/T HOTMINTSquadron511 [Call Sign]W/T WDZ R/T PARTNERSHIP
  4. a. Lead Box: Taxi–0555; Take-Off –0610; E.T.D. Field–0610
    b. Low Box: Taxi–0610; Take-Off –0620; E.T.D. Field–____
  5. Time:Height:  Place of Crossing English Coast: (OUT)
    080016,000 Ft Great Yarmouth
  6. Time:Height:  Place of Crossing Enemy Coast: (IN)
    083522,000 Ft 52°37'N-04°37'E [10 miles NE of Dunkirk, France]
  7. Time:Height:  Place of Crossing Enemy Coast: (Out)
    125022,000 Ft 52°37'N-04°37'E [10 miles NE of Dunkirk, France]
  8. Time:Height:  Place of Crossing English Coast: (IN)
    13314,000 Ft Great Yarmouth
  9. E.T.R.(Estimated Time of Return) Base: 1408 Hours
  10. MF/DF [Medium Frequency/Direction Finder] Section: "H"
  11. Bomb load of Each A/C: "A" Lead Box
    508 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
    509 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
    510 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
    511 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]


    Bomb load of Each A/C: "A" Low Box
    508 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
    509 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
    510 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
    511 Squadron: 3 x 1000 G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 Nose x 1/40 Tail [Fuse] and 5 M17 I.B. [Incendiary Bomb]
  12. Fuel Load of each A/C: 2700 Gallons
  13. Group Leader:
    a. Lead Box: Name: E.A. Romig Rank: Col. A/C: 7651-C  Sqdn. 324th
    b. Low Box: Name: R.B. Clay Rank: Capt. A/C: 8005-G Sqdn. 509th
  14. Passengers, if any: (Full Name, Rank, A/C and Squadron Passenger flying with)
    None
  15. Actual Times Off and Return by Squadrons and A/C Letters:
  16. Lead Box
    SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.
    5081711–F________5097845–F________
    2613–C________1384–T________
    1702–A________3120–O________
    7325–H________0499–Q________
    7144–R________
    7149–X________
    Spare7169–N________
    5101899–B________511None
    7077–D________
    1721–S________3247651–C________
    2576–C________7601–J________
    8038–R________
    1975–O________
    Spare7714–T________
  17. Low Box
    SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.
    5088146–D________5098005–G________
    7349–B________7193–P________
    Spare7157–N________7202–Z________
    1725–L________
    5101509–V________5117472–H________
    0857–J________1748–V________
    1560–A________9987–D________
    7196–M________1238–A________
    7191–X________
    7318–S________
    7492–B________
    8153–F________
    Spare1714–R________

    Report Compiled By Irving C. Muesing, S/Sgt.



Formation Chart:
Lead Combat Box Formation Take–Off
508th Squadron
Romig–Grunow
A/C 7651 C PFF
Evans
A/C 42-31711 F
Richardson–Maginn
A/C 7601 J PFF
Overholt
A/C 42-102613 C
Rhode
A/C 42-97325 H
Crowe
A/C 42-31702 A
510th Squadron509th Squadron
McClelland
A/C 42-31899 B
Whalen
A/C 42-37845 F
Chalmers
A/C 42-31721 S
Crockett
A/C 42-107077 D
Hicks
A/C 42-3120 O
Watkins
A/C 42-31384 T
Olson
A/C 42-102576 C
Redmond
A/C 42-30499 Q
Hopkins
A/C 42-31975 O
Walker
A/C 42-38038 R
Myers
A/C 42-97149 X
Fowler
A/C 42-97144 R
Presley
A/C 42-37714 T Spare
Garcia
A/C 42-97169 N Spare


Lead Combat Box Formation Over–Target
508th Squadron
Romig–Grunow
A/C PFF
Richardson–Maginn
A/C PFF
Overholt
A/C 42-102613 C
Rhode
A/C 42-97325 H
Crowe
A/C 42-31702 A
510th Squadron509th Squadron
Olson
A/C 42-102576 C
Redmond
A/C 42-30499 Q
Chalmers
A/C 42-31721 S
Crockett
A/C 42-107077 D
Hicks
A/C 42-3120 O
Watkins
A/C 42-31384 T
Hopkins
A/C 42-31975 O
Walker
A/C 42-38038 R
Myers
A/C 42-97149 X
Fowler
A/C 42-97144 R


Time Schedule:
Zero Hour: 0800  Briefing: ____  Stations: 0535  Start Engines: 0545  Taxi: 0555  Take-off: 0610  Leave Base: 0610



Low Combat Box Formation Take–Off
509th Squadron
Clay
A/C 42-38005 G
Viste
A/C 42-97202 Z
Wroblewski
A/C 42-97193 P
Berardi
A/C 42-31725 L
Carson
A/C 42-97349 B
Roper
A/C 42-38146 D
511th Squadron510th Squadron
Nay
A/C 42-39987 D
Ross
A/C 42-31509 V
Miller
A/C 42-97191 X
Karagiannis
A/C 42-31238 A
Borchert
A/C 42-31560 A
Auten
A/C 42-30857 J
Brooks
A/C 42-97318 S
Raser
A/C 42-97196 M
Power
A/C 42-38153 F
Zotollo
A/C 42-97492 B
Turbyne
A/C 42-31748 V
Lemley
A/C 42-97472 H
Smith
A/C 42-31714 R Spare
Nall
A/C 42-97157 N Spare


Low Combat Box Formation Over–Target
509th Squadron
Clay
A/C 42-38005 G
Viste
A/C 42-97202 Z
Wroblewski
A/C 42-97193 P
Carson
A/C 42-97349 B
Lemley
A/C 42-97472 H
Roper
A/C 42-38146 D
511th Squadron510th Squadron
Nay
A/C 42-39987 D
Ross
A/C 42-31509 V
Miller
A/C 42-97191 X
Karagiannis
A/C 42-31238 A
Borchert
A/C 42-31560 A
Auten
A/C 42-30857 J
Brooks
A/C 42-97318 S
Power
A/C 42-38153 F
Zotollo
A/C 42-97492 B


Time Schedule:
Zero Hour: 0800  Briefing: ____  Stations: 0535  Start Engines: 0545  Taxi: 0555  Take-off: 0610  Leave Base: 0610


Missing Air Crew Report (MACR):
  • A/C# 42-37714   TU-T  "Ronchi"  Pilot: Presley     A/C's 18th Mission   MACR # 4953

    Aircraft Loss Circumstances:

    42-37714, piloted by 2nd Lt. Presley on his first mission, was hit by flak over the target just before bombs away and was last seen heading down under control. The plane disappeared in the clouds before any parachutes could be seen. All crew members parachuted safely and the plane crashed SW of Haarlem at sea, Netherlands.

    Individual Accounts of Crewmen Fates:
    • Pilot - 2nd Lt. Presley, Robert C., From Michigan, POW at Stalag Luft 3 Sagan-Silesia Bavaria (Moved to Nuremberg-Langwasser) 49-11, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Co-pilot - 2nd Lt. STAMPER, MIXON C., From Texas, POW at Stalag Luft 3 Sagan-Silesia Bavaria (Moved to Nuremberg-Langwasser) 49-11, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Navigator - 2nd Lt. SIMPSON, JAMES W., From Kentucky, POW at Stalag Luft 3 Sagan-Silesia Bavaria (Moved to Nuremberg-Langwasser) 49-11, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Bombardier - 2nd Lt. MOSEBACH, HERBERT J., From Texas, POW at (Camp name undefined in National Archives records database.) Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Top Turret Gunner - S/Sgt COCCO, ERNEST E., From Michigan, POW at Stalag Luft 4 Gross-Tychow (formerly Heydekrug) Pomerania, Prussia (moved to Wobbelin Bei Ludwigslust) (To Usedom Bei Savenmunde) 54-16, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Radio Operator - S/Sgt KLEEMAN, ROBERT W., From Colorado, POW at Stalag Luft 4 Gross-Tychow (formerly Heydekrug) Pomerania, Prussia (moved to Wobbelin Bei Ludwigslust) (To Usedom Bei Savenmunde) 54-16, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Left Waist Gunner - Sgt MELLON, KENNETH L., From Kansas, POW at Stalag Luft 4 Gross-Tychow (formerly Heydekrug) Pomerania, Prussia (moved to Wobbelin Bei Ludwigslust) (To Usedom Bei Savenmunde) 54-16, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Right Waist Gunner - Sgt WARCOLA, ALEX, From Pennsylvania, POW at Stalag Luft 3 Sagan-Silesia Bavaria (Moved to Nuremberg-Langwasser) 49-11, European Theatre: Germany Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Ball Turret Gunner - Sgt VAN SANT, FRED W., From California, POW at Stalag 7A Moosburg Bavaria 48-12 (Work Camps 3324-46 Krumbachstrasse 48011, Work Camp 3368 Munich 48-11), Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.
    • Tail Gunner - Sgt ROBERTSON, ISAAC W., From Kentucky, POW at Stalag Luft 4 Gross-Tychow (formerly Heydekrug) Pomerania, Prussia (moved to Wobbelin Bei Ludwigslust) (To Usedom Bei Savenmunde) 54-16, Returned to Military Control, Liberated or Repatriated.

 [Wounded - 3]
 [Prisoner of War - 10]

The above records were obtained at the National Archives Records Administration and have been declassified by authority NND 745005
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